Positive feedback regarding a recent blogpost :0)

I just wanted to share this with readers of this blog, because it made me smile :)

Following my blog post yesterday about creating a sequence of several (mostly sequencing) activities based on the same short story, with the activities gradually increasing in difficulty, and with the focus on speed AND accuracy... today I received the following email on the moretprs yahoo group email, from Ann Schroeder of Cincinnati, Ohio:

"I have been playing with the Moggin sequence that you sent (http://www.textivate.com/sequence-w4njn1). I teach German and know just enough Spanish (from TPRS conferences, of course!) to impress the students. I don't really know enough to actually read that text (maybe 60-70%). I tried the activities to see how much my German kids really have to *know* in order to complete the work (versus using quotes and punctuation to guess.) 

"The first couple were easy for me. Now, on the 3x5, I'm challenged, but I've seen the text enough times that it feels do-able. It's forcing me to look at the text more closely, distinguish between what the boy says and what the girl says, and understand the smaller words that I was originally able to ignore.

"IT'S BEAUTIFUL!!! It's exactly what I want to happen with my students! I can't say enough great things about textivate. And if you already subscribe, don't forget to browse the blog every once in a while for ideas like this. Fantastic!"

And then a little later, this:

"And an update: I just went to the Spanish teacher and retold a truncated version in Spanish during lunch! Yay!"

Really made my day :0)

Making a reading resource with multiple choice matching to check / reinforce comprehension.

This link opens the activity shown in the image above:
http://www.textivate.com/frames.php?ext=50069143432406z&res=m_1in4-50069143432406ze1

This is a cool way of checking and reinforcing understanding of key elements of a text. In this case it is a very short text, but the same principle could easily apply to any text.

What we have here is essentially a reading activity with a multiple choice matching activity. Note the following:

Automatic word clouds in textivate (Sort of)

You may have come across this blog post based on using an image of a wordcloud to support a textivate resource.

Well I think that, essentially, the main benefit of a wordcloud is that it provides the student with a record of all of the words in the text, so that they have a reference for spelling, and so that if they are doing an activity such as the one shown in the above image, they can look at the list if they are stuck on a particular word.

Then this got me thinking that it would be even better if the list was in alphabetical order...