tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:/posts The textivate blog 2021-08-19T15:45:02Z . . tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1640013 2021-01-14T11:37:21Z 2021-08-01T15:05:03Z Sound matching: various ideas for vocab matching with audio in TEXTIVATE

This blog post explores various Sound Match options in Textivate, each with a different focus and level of support.

1) L2 audio >> L1 text

In the example below, the prompt is French audio (TTS), and students have to match it with the English text.

To set this up:

  • Via the "Extras" tab, set the "Match - Left" TTS to French.
  • Your matching items look like this:
    speak::Bonjour==Hello
    speak::Comment tu t'appelles?==What is your name?
  • It makes sense to disable all of the activities that would require students to rebuild or spell the English. So, via the "Extras" tab, I've disabled the bottom 2 rows of Match activities.

Here's a link to the activity menu for the resource:
https://www.textivate.com/menu-cc1mn1

For the activities, you should ensure that TTS is turned on (French on) so that the audio plays. You can specify this in Sequence activities and in links to individual activities. The activity embedded below has TTS turned on.

Click Match x 8:

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

2) L2 audio >> L2 text

In the example below, the prompt is French audio (TTS), and students have to match it with / rebuild the French text.

To set this up:

  • Via the "Extras" tab, set the "Match - Left" TTS to French.
  • Your matching items look like this:
    speak::Bonjour==Bonjour
    speak::Comment tu t'appelles?==Comment tu t'appelles?
    or:
    speak::==Bonjour
    speak::==Comment tu t'appelles?
    (i.e. you can leave the text on the left blank and just include the speak:: instruction, which, in this case, tells textivate to say whatever is on the right)
  • No need to disable any of the activities, as all will require students to either match what they hear with the written form, or rebuild or type out the written form based on what they hear (i.e. various forms of dictation).

Here's a link to the activity menu for the resource:
https://www.textivate.com/menu-7c1mn1

For the activities, you should ensure that TTS is turned on (French on) so that the audio plays. You can specify this in Sequence activities and in links to individual activities. The activities embedded below have TTS turned on.

Jumble:

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

Initials:

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

3) L2 audio + text >> L1 text

In the example below, the prompt is French audio (TTS) AND text, and students have to match it with the English text.

To set this up:

  • Via the "Extras" tab, set the "Match - Left" TTS to French.
  • Your matching items look like this:
    Bonjour==Hello
    Comment tu t'appelles?==What is your name?
    (i.e. no speak:: instruction required)
  • It makes sense to disable all of the activities that would require students to rebuild or spell the English. So, via the "Extras" tab, I've disabled the bottom 2 rows of Match activities.

The difference between this format and 1 above is that students get to see / read the French as well as hear it. This means that it is less a test of their aural comprehension, as students are able to read the French, so to some extent, the activities become more about translation from French to English. BUT one advantage is that this format reinforces the sound / spelling link, in that students get to make an association between how the language is written and what it sounds like. 

Here's a link to the activity menu for the resource:
https://www.textivate.com/menu-fc1mn1

For the activities, you should ensure that TTS is turned on (French on) so that the audio plays. You can specify this in Sequence activities and in links to individual activities. The activity embedded below has TTS turned on.

Million:

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

4) L2 audio + L1 text >> L2 text

In the example below, the prompt is French audio (TTS) AND English text, and students have to match it with / rebuild the French text.

To set this up:

  • Via the "Extras" tab, set the "Match - Right" TTS to French.
  • Your matching items look like this:
    Hello==Bonjour
    What is your name?==Comment tu t'appelles?
    (i.e. no speak:: instruction required)
  • No need to disable any of the activities, as all will require students to either match what they hear with the written form, or rebuild or type out the written form based on what they hear, whilst at the same time having the English to reinforce the meaning (i.e. various forms of dictation / translation into L2).

The difference between this format and 2 above is that students get to see / read the English at the same time as they hear the French. This means that it is less a test of their aural comprehension, as students are able to use translation skills to translate from English to French. BUT this format reinforces sound / spelling links, in that students get to make an association between how the language is written and what it sounds like, AND it becomes a combined translation + dictation multi-modal resource, where student use multiple skills to arrive at the correct answer.

Here's a link to the activity menu for the resource:
https://www.textivate.com/menu-hc1mn1

For the activities, you should ensure that TTS is turned on (French on) so that the audio plays. You can specify this in Sequence activities and in links to individual activities. The activities embedded below have TTS turned on.

Jumble:

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

No letters:

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

5) Image + L2 audio >> L2 text

In the example below, the prompt is an image + French audio (TTS), and students have to match it with / rebuild the French text.

This one is a bit trickier to set up, because it requires you to have images stored somewhere where they can be linked to textivate. See this user guide on how to do this:
Talking pictures: image-based match resources with added TTS

Essentially, this format is very similar to 4 above, with the exception that it uses images to reinforce meaning rather than the L1 text. This has the advantage that students cannot simply translate the English to French to work out what the answer is (and it's good for those who don't like to use the L1 in their resources), BUT the disadvantage of images is that, while they may hint at the meaning, they don't make it 100% clear to students what the French that they are writing / matching actually means. (This is certainly true of the examples below...)

Here's a link to the activity menu for the resource:
https://www.textivate.com/menu-yfnln1

For the activities, you should ensure that TTS is turned on (French on) so that the audio plays. You can specify this in Sequence activities and in links to individual activities. The activities embedded below have TTS turned on.

Multi Match 1 in3:

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

Jumble

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

Initials:

Click below to access the activity. (Opens in a new window on touch devices.)
Click here to open the above activity in a new window.

Hope you found this guide useful :o)

Related posts:



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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1620689 2020-11-24T12:40:05Z 2020-11-24T12:48:53Z Adding images to Textivate from Google Drive

Those familiar with textivate's more advanced features will be aware that you can set up image-based matching activities which match images with text items. They will also be aware that the images have to be hosted elsewhere (i.e. there's no facility to upload them to textivate...)

Until recently, our blog post / user-guide on adding images only listed 2 options for image hosting: IMGUR and DropBox.

Google Drive was never listed as an option because the share link that you typically get for files hosted on Google Drive is a link to a page containing the file rather than to the file itself. But I recently discovered (thanks to Dwight Hensler, of Haven of Peace Academy, Tanzania) that there is a way of getting a direct file link. Here's how...

1. Right-click the image in Google Drive and click on "Get link" (see below)

2. Make sure the share info is set to Public / Anyone with the link

If when you click to get the share link, you see that the sharing is "Restricted" (see below)...

... click on the little down-arrow and change it to "Anyone with the link" (see below)

3. Copy the image ID from the share link

As I said previously, the link that is provided at this stage points to a page hosting the image, rather than to the image itself. So you need to copy just the image ID from the URL. To do this, I find it works best to double-click the image ID part of the URL twice (first time it selects the whole URL, second time just the image ID) so that it is selected as shown in the image below:

Use ctrl+C or right-click and copy to copy the Image ID.

4. Paste the ID into a new link that points directly to the image

So you need to use that ID from the previous step, but in a different URL, which looks like this:

https://drive.google.com/thumbnail?id=YourImageID

In fact you can save yourself a bit of time by copying and pasting the following line into the Textivate text editor as many times as there are images for your resource, and then selecting and pasting or over-writing the relevant parts:

[img]https://drive.google.com/thumbnail?id=YourImageID[/img]==YourMatchingText

For each row of the above items, double-click YourImageID and paste into it the image ID that you copied. Then double-click YourMatchingText and type or paste in your matching text that goes with that image.

Good, eh? 

:0)



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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/764664 2020-11-24T12:21:49Z 2020-11-24T12:50:09Z Textivate MATCH activities with IMAGES...

This feature has been available for quite some time, but I haven't blogged about it, so here goes:

Textivate allows you to make interactive matching activities (and worksheets) matching images with text.

Here's how it's done:

Click on the "Match" tab. 

Then add your image-to-text matching data in the following format:

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/731569 2020-10-01T08:54:41Z 2020-10-01T09:00:07Z Adding an audio file to your textivate resource

Just as you can add a video to your textivate resources, as explained here, or an image (see here), you can now add an audio file to a textivate resource so that students can listen to it as they complete the activities.

As with video and image embedding, there are 2 methods:

1. Via the "Extras" tab

Simply click on the Extras tab and type or paste the link to your audio in the "Audio url" box.

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1595670 2020-09-19T10:49:00Z 2020-10-07T15:39:02Z Textivate Resource Management: An Overview

(Note that this user guide will not deal with the specifics of creating resources, as there are plenty of other user guides for those sorts of things. This one is more about the mechanics of the functionality of the Textivate home page.)

Textivate is like a text editor that is used to generate interactive resources. Imagine that it's being used to create files, just like a desktop version of Word or something like that.

New Resource

When you want to start a new resource, it's like starting with a new text file. In Textivate, to do this, you click on the New Resource icon (see below). This clears the content from all 5 tabs and starts you off with an empty unsaved "file".

Then you can go about the business of creating your own resource, by entering your content into the Text, Match, Extras and Sequence tabs (depending on the type of resource you want to create). Note that the "Show all" tab combines the content from the other 4 tabs, and this represents in fact the contents of "text file" that will eventually be uploaded to the Textivate server.

Saving / Uploading a Resource

So you've finished adding the text etc for your resource. But your "unsaved file" is only available to you at the moment. To "save" it and make it available to others, you need to upload it by clicking on the "Upload" icon (see below).

Once you have done this, your "text file" (the contents of the "Show all" tab) is uploaded onto the Textivate server and is identifiable via a unique 6-digit resource identifier. (You've now uploaded your text file into a huge online repository full of thousands of other text files, each with a unique ID, and each with different access rights).

If you upload your resource as a "Public" resource, all Textivate users will be able to find it via the public resource search. If you upload it as "Shareable", they won't find it in the resource search, but you will be able to share it with others via a link. If you upload it as "Private", only you will be able to access the resource. (If you have a "Basic" subscription, you can only upload files as "Private".)

Trying Out Activities

If you want to see what the activities for your resource will look like, click on the textivate>> button to go to an activity menu page. 

From there you will be able to click on the various activity options from the menu and try out the activities. Use Textivate's "Back" buttons to navigate back to the home page.

Assigning a Resource

Your resources are not automatically assigned to anybody simply because you have created them. If you want your students to interact with the resource that you have created, you need to send them or share with them a link to the specific resource, activity, sequence, whatever.

Once you have uploaded your text file to Textivate, you can get a link for that file, so that you can share it with others (as long as you uploaded it as "Public" or "Shareable"). To do this, you click on the "Share" icon (see below).

If your resource is uploaded (as "Public" / "Shareable") you will see tha same "Share" icon on the menu screen and on all activity screens. The URL that is provided via the "Share" icon differs according to the page that you are on (i.e. the link points to the page that you are on).

IMPORTANT: If you have created a "Sequence" for your resource, and you want to share a link to that "Sequence", you MUST make sure that you click on the "link to sequence" option. This changes the share URL so that it points specifically to the "Sequence".

See this user guide all about sharing links in Textivate.

The "Share" icon also provides options for sharing directly to your Textivate "Classes" (if you have set them up, see more below) and also for sharing with your Google Classroom.

Tracking Progress

Textivate is a practice tool and does not keep any records of student activity by default. But there are 2 modes in which Textivate will track student activity, in very different ways:

  • "Sequence": a specific set of activities for which you specify various parameters affecting the on-screen experience, as well as the pass mark, where you get to see the scores, time taken, etc, for each activity. See this user-guide introducing "Sequences".
  • "Challenge": a scoreboard competition where students score points on the scoreboard based on the number and accuracy of their interactions for all completed activities. See this introduction to "Challenges".

See this blog post which compares "Sequences" and "Challenges".

Saving Changes (No Share Icon!!)

Once you have saved / uploaded a resource, Textivate will look out for any subsequent changes that you may make to the resource. If you type / delete something new into one of the text boxes, or if you add a User-defined Gap-fill, a Trapdoor activity, text-to-speech, a parallel text, etc etc. -- i.e. if you make ANY changes to the resource content -- the "Share" icon will be replaced with a "Save Changes" icon (see below):

Why does it do this? Well, if you have made changes to the file on your device, but these changes have not been updated to the server, the "text file" on our server is out-of-date and no longer reflects the true content of your resource. So, you save the changes, and the "Share" icon reappears.

Classes / Student Log-ins

If you want to be able to share links directly with your classes, the simplest way is to set up "Classes" on Textivate. To do this (or to manage existing "Classes", change passwords, delete assigned links etc), click on the "Manage Students / Classes" icon (see below).

Once you have got a "Class" set up, you will see a "Share with class" button along with the other share options in the "Share" box (accessed via the "Share" icon).

See this user guide on setting up classes, managing students and assigning individual log-ins to students.

Accessing Saved Resources

To access your uploaded resources on Textivate, you use the "Search" icon, which is available below the text boxes on the Textivate home screen (see below)...

...or at the top right of the page on both the home page and the activity menu.

This "Search" function is the way that you access:

  • "Public" resources (uploaded by yourself and thousands of other Textivate users)
  • "My resources" (these are your own uploaded resources)
  • "Recently viewed" (like a history of the last 100 resources that you accessed)
  • "Favourites" (apologies to those in N.America for the UK spelling ;-)

Note that if you have set up "Classes" for your students with individual log-ins, "Search" + "My resources" is where students will see links that have been shared with them via the "Share to class" button mentioned in the "Assigning a Resource" section above.



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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1574608 2020-07-17T16:56:04Z 2020-07-17T16:56:04Z Sound effects added to textivate activities

We've added some simple sound effects to Textivate activities !!

These will affect keyboard and click interactions, and we feel that they add to the textivate experience.

Sound effects are enabled by default. If you look at the top right of each activity screen you'll see a musical notation symbol which representes sounds. Enabled looks like this:

If you click on the musical note, you'll disable the sound effects, and your choice will be remembered in a browser cookie. Disabled looks like this:

That's all! Hope you like this small addition to textivate :o)

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1571669 2020-07-10T16:50:38Z 2020-07-10T17:18:03Z Getting the most out of your parallel-text KOs in textivate

This post features a video tutorial on how teachers who follow a "parallel text knowledge organiser" approach can exploit their KOs to maximum effect in textivate.

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1568796 2020-07-04T12:05:57Z 2020-07-04T14:03:38Z A basic how-to for students using textivate to learn their work

NB. This resource assumes that students have a student log-in (i.e. requires Premium or Group subscription).
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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/743486 2020-07-04T11:00:12Z 2020-07-04T11:25:04Z Students learning speaking assessments

If you have a textivate Premium or Group subscription, your students get a shared student password which enables them to:

  1. Browse the public resources on textivate.
  2. Modify existing resources and do activities "on the fly".
  3. Create their own activities "on the fly".
  4. Save their own texts in local storage for access on the same device (or on the same user profile if on a school network).
  5. Copy and paste their resources between textivate and other text storage such as word docs, txt files or email messages.

Enhancing "on the fly" resources with extra features

In addition to a text or a list of matching items, students can also add...

  1. A parallel text (containing a translation of the text in English, or containing notes as prompts to reproduce the parallel text)
  2. Text-to-speech! -- with all of the usual caveats regarding the accuracy of text-to-speech, it can be really useful in helping students to learn the correct pronunciation.
  3. A parallel audio or video.

With regard to speaking controlled assessments this means that students can add notes and audio / TTS (text-to-speech) to their practice text, and it's dead easy to do.

Here's what you have to do:

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1385586 2019-03-14T14:12:43Z 2021-08-19T15:44:49Z Textivate says my score is too low, even though it's higher than the target. (Or is it...?)

"Textivate keeps asking me to do a sequence activity again because my score was too low, even though it was higher than the target..."

I get this sort of query a lot. Look at the image and you can see where the confusion arises: the student is told that the score is too low, because they only got 83%, and the target is 81%. But all isn't quite as it seems...

What is happening here is the following: textivate reduces the target score by 10% each time the student fails to reach the target score. This is so as to avoid a situation where a student is unable to pass an activity because of one little mistake.

It's actually there to help the student!! Without it, he would have to keep on trying until he got the initial target for that activity (which could be anywhere from 50% to 100%, depending on how it was set up by the teacher).

In the example in the image, the initial target was 90%. The student failed to meet the target, as he only got 83%. The target was then reduced by 10% to 81% for the next try. (If he failed to meet this target, it would be reduced again by 10%, this time to 73%, etc, etc.)

I hope this helps explain what's going on when you see this sort of thing. Remember, it's actually there to help the student.

And besides, more practice = more repetitions = better learning / acquisition :o)

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1371896 2019-02-08T13:43:13Z 2019-02-08T13:47:16Z Share links with classes / My resources for individual student log-ins

Sharing links with classes

If you are logged on as a teacher on textivate, AND you have one or more classes set up (via the Classes menu), you can click on the share icon on any textivate page, fine-tune the link in whatever way you like, and share this link with one or more of your classes.

(If you are not familiar with the share icon and sharing links on textivate, see this blog post.)

(If you are not familiar with the concept of fine-tuning links on textivate, see this blog post.)

When you click the share icon (and presuming you are logged in as a teacher and you have one or more classes set up) you will see a "Share with class" button next to the Twitter and Facebook share buttons, as shown below:

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1313100 2018-08-18T17:30:54Z 2018-08-18T19:18:17Z French alphabet sound match (using TTS) :o)

Some activities to practise the French alphabet.

The activities use TTS to read out the French letters. Students simply have to click on the letter they hear. 

Find out more about TTS in textivate

Find out how to make "sound match" activities such as these

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1313008 2018-08-18T11:29:32Z 2018-08-18T19:18:43Z Team Challenges: how to get individual student scores (and see behind scoreboard aliases)

This simple tutorial looks at a new feature (as of 18th August 2018) which allows you to access individual student scores in team challenges.

How to set this up:

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1312002 2018-08-15T12:41:39Z 2018-08-18T19:19:08Z TRAPDOOR TRANSLATION: Using Trapdoor in Textivate to make a multiple-choice translation rebuild activity

(Please scroll down to the bottom of the post to try the activity for yourself.)

This post refers to the optional text-based activity, Trapdoor, as introduced in this blog-post / user-guide:
http://textivate.posthaven.com/new-optional-text-activity-trapdoor

The end result of this blog post also requires you to include a parallel text translation in the L1 (which may or may not be divided into "chunks" by adding vertical pipes as in the example shown). See this user-guide on parallel texts and how to add them to your resource:
http://textivate.posthaven.com/parallel-texts-slash-extra-texts-along-with-a-textivate-resource

The procedure...

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1306529 2018-07-27T23:03:00Z 2018-11-10T12:13:04Z Textivate Testimonials

The page contains an assortment of quotes from textivate users. Please feel free to contact textivate if you'd like to know the source of any of these quotes.

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1286301 2018-05-22T11:36:10Z 2018-08-18T19:19:38Z Some GCSE SPANISH translation resources...

The resources in this post were created based on texts taken from old GCSE Spanish papers, and which featured in a booklet uploaded to the Secondary MFL Matters Facebook group by Kate Jones. Here they are presented in the same order that they appear in Kate's booklet.

The images below are clickable and will open the menu for each resource in a separate browser tab. 

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1251949 2018-02-23T20:30:53Z 2018-08-18T19:20:29Z For group subscriptions: sharing resources with group members

A new feature for those with Group subscriptions (23rd Feb 2018)...

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1238710 2018-01-27T10:34:48Z 2018-08-18T19:20:55Z The "textivate>>" button

The "textivate>>" button is where the magic happens :0)

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1229160 2018-01-09T14:35:19Z 2021-08-19T15:45:02Z Not-quite translation: transforming L1 notes to L2 text

Today I read a blog post on the Language Teacher Toolkit blog by Steve Smith entitled "Google Translate beaters". 

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1229091 2018-01-09T12:41:57Z 2021-08-19T15:45:00Z Textivate now served via https (secure site access)

At the end of December 2017 we migrated textivate to new servers, and the site is now also served via https only. 

The pros

The benefits of this are:

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1204488 2017-11-10T17:26:04Z 2018-08-18T19:23:18Z Create Challenges based on Textivate Plus resources

Somebody said it would be nice if they could make Challenges based on Textivate Plus resources. So we added that functionality :)

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1204244 2017-11-09T16:37:12Z 2018-08-18T19:23:53Z Parameters for Challenges :)

If you edit an existing Challenge or click to add a new Challenge, you can now set some parameters for the activities within your Challenge.

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1191479 2017-09-15T16:49:31Z 2018-08-18T19:24:42Z Dual-language parallel texts for vocab-in-context activities

Just something I was playing around with today, sort of based on this idea on "Using mini dual texts to present vocab in context in MFL lessons" from the TaskMagic blog.

I thought it would be nice to make both the L2 and the L1 text available at the same time as a parallel text along with vocab activities, as a way of drawing students' attention to how the sentences break down (and, conversely, how the chunks of meaning are fitted together to make sentences).

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1189254 2017-09-06T15:40:20Z 2020-03-15T04:49:49Z Circling questions (just trying something out...)

Just trying something out: activities based on TPRS-style "circling" questions. What do you think? The plan is to make a tool that can help teachers to generate circling questions based on their text, that can be used in the ways shown here. The image (above) includes a parallel text. The circling questions appear in a specific order.

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1187609 2017-09-02T09:51:53Z 2019-07-02T12:33:32Z Working with written texts... (inspired by TLTT)

I've just been reading through chapter 10 of the excellent "The Language Teacher Toolkit" by Steve Smith and Gianfranco Conti (available here). 

The chapter is called "Working with written texts" and it gives a list of 30 or so different types of activities that can be done with written texts. As I read through the list it occurred to me that many of the activities listed can be automated and can therefore be delivered via textivate. I thought I'd put together some examples :)

The sections below are: 1. Listen and read; 2. Jigsaw reading; 3. Parallel texts; 4. Find the French; 5. Synonyms; 6. Definitions; 7. Question forming; 8. Completing sentences; 9. True, false, not mentioned; 10. Matching tasks; 11. Multiple-choice questions; 12. "Wh" questions; 13. Gap-filling; 14. Changing the point of view; 15. Translation; 16. Dictation; + Other activities.

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1184740 2017-08-18T16:36:25Z 2019-07-02T12:35:45Z Working with chunks :)

It was suggested to me recently that it would be really good if textivate could provide text re-build activities based on chunks specified by the teacher. The rationale behind this is that it is better for students to work with words grouped in meaningful chunks rather than in isolation or in randomly generated segments.

Textivate has always had re-build activities based on letters, words, sentences and randomly split sections of text, but until now, there was no way of specifying chunks. 

Follow the instructions below to set up reconstruction activities based on your own user-specified chunks:

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1171852 2017-07-09T09:10:04Z 2020-12-06T16:11:22Z Manage classes and students for individual student log-ins and sequences which can be completed on multiple devices

The post discusses the student password options in textivate and shows you how to set up classes and individual log-ins for your students. (Premium / Group subscribers only.)

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1166167 2017-06-21T16:52:14Z 2020-10-12T20:27:23Z New optional text activity: Trapdoor :)

If you open a text resource or type in some text in the text tab on the textivate edit screen, you'll see a new "Trapdoor" button. Click this to add a Trapdoor activity to your resource.

A Trapdoor activity is a multiple choice activity where students click their way through the options to (re-)build the text. It is called Trapdoor because if they get a section wrong, they fall through the trapdoor and they have to start again.

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1154969 2017-05-18T15:37:22Z 2018-08-18T19:29:53Z New search functionality, plus views and likes

Several small updates and improvements:

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tag:textivate.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1154956 2017-05-18T14:53:27Z 2018-08-18T19:30:30Z Set and enforce your own team names for scoreboard challenges

New feature as of May 2017

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